Jason Zweig will discuss his latest book, The Devil’s Financial Dictionary, and how he went about distilling everything he had learned in almost three decades as an investing journalist into definitions of Wall Street terms that are, in many cases, only a few words long. Markets are driven much more by psychology and history than by economics. In writing The Devil’s Financial Dictionary, Zweig was guided largely by a saying of his father’s: “It’s remarkable how much you have to learn in order to realize how little you need to know.”

“This is the most amusing presentation of the principles of finance that I have ever seen.” —Robert J. Shiller, professor of finance, Yale University; Nobel laureate in economics; author of Irrational Exuberance

“Part social commentary, part instruction manual, Zweig’s book is must-reading for anyone who presumes or desires to understand the investment world…. Like the book in which they’re contained, each of Zweig’s entries is pointed, witty, and revealing of important and useful truths. The Devil himself, a.k.a., [Ambrose] Bierce, would be proud.” —TIME

About the Author
Jason Zweig writes a weekly column, “The Intelligent Investor,” for The Wall Street Journal. He is the author of The Devil’s Financial Dictionary, a satirical glossary of financial terms; Your Money and Your Brain, on the neuroscience and psychology of financial decision-making; and The Little Book of Safe Money, an investing guide. The editor of the revised edition of Benjamin Graham’s The Intelligent Investor and co-editor of Benjamin Graham: Building a Profession, Zweig also assisted the Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman in writing his book, Thinking, Fast and Slow. Before joining The Wall Street Journal, Zweig worked at Money, Forbes and TIME.

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